Shoeing Horses for Winter Conditions

Posted in: Featured, Horse Care, Horse Supplies, Ranch Life, Rodeo

Snow balling up in horses’ feet is a treacherous and common situation in snowy winter conditions. Even barefoot horses have serious snow balling in their feet, often turning to hard ice balls. But what does one use when there is a need for shoeing horses?

Forever barefoot was the way to go in these wintery conditions. Castle Plastic Popper Snow pads are now options for horses that need to be shod.

horse shoeing for winter conditions

A standard snow pad for horse shoes.

These pads have a round ball that actually pops the snow out in their feet as the horse moves around, never letting it accumulate in their feet. Popper Snow Pads are miracles and work well for horses out in pastures and for ones being ridden outside in winter conditions. However, these full snow pads are dangerous to have on horses that are ridden inside and have to work in dry ground such as arenas.  Full snow pads are virtually impossible to have on horses in indoor competition.

winter horse shoeing

Performance snow pad for winter horse shoeing

Castle Plastic NB rim snow pads are a great answer for horses that are out in snow and yet also are in working in dry ground. Rim snow pads are basically cut out snow pads with a special rim that pops the snow out. In an arena they allow the hoof to fill up with dirt giving an arena horse traction.

winter horse shoeing

Notice how this rim snow pad still gives traction and allows you to have your horses safely shod in the winter.

Shoeing horses for winter conditions has been made safe and doable, outside and inside by using Popper Snow Pads.

Posted in: Featured, Horse Care, Horse Supplies, Ranch Life, Rodeo


About Lynn Kohr

I am a barrel and pole horse trainer, giving springtime barrel racing and pole bending clinics and workshops, competing in barrel racing and pole bending futurities while marketing our horses for sale. I am a Mom of 3: Sage 14, Cedar 13 and Stratton 11...

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